Showing posts with label Caroline McMenamin. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Caroline McMenamin. Show all posts

Monday, 1 January 2018

My Victories of 2017



Saturday 4th February

I woke up in Dublin on my Birthday. We spent the day exploring our favourite parts of Dublin. My boyfriend and I went to the beautiful Italian restaurant, ‘Il Posto’  for dinner. This is where we went for our first date, 3 years prior. We intended to ‘go out’ after dinner, but our mutual love for all things cosy and comfortable led us straight back to our hotel. I turned 28. 

My mind feels decades older. Mental Health illness will do that do you. 

Friday 3rd March

For the first time, I visited Edinburgh. We stayed in a quirky Airbnb. In those freezing days in March I saw the iconic architecture of a city that proudly cherishes both its past and future.

As an old soul, and that ancient mind of mine, you could see why I found the archaic ascending path to Edinburgh castle absolutely captivating. I walked through the dark passageways as if I was cautiously navigating the through the mind of Robert Lewis Stevenson himself, unaware if the shadows of the people who passed were like that of Dr Jekyll, or more a sinister Mr Hyde; reminding me of the duality of my own mind. I had tea in quaint tea rooms, bought authentic Tartan scarves, visited The Writers' Museum, and celebrated the 1st Birthday of my boyfriend’s Niece.  




Thursday 14th April

For Easter I went to Tegernsee in Germany, just an hour from where my boyfriend lives in Bavaria. We stayed in a Spa/Boutique hotel which was very quaint. We walked around the town which seemed to still be in hibernation, but we loved it nonetheless. I find a strange comfort in stillness, it brings calm to an otherwise un-still mind.

April 20th- 28th

Within these dates I did a makeup demonstration in Debenhams for Lancome, launched my mental health organisation ‘Replenish’ , did two mental health talks, did session 1 of 6 of the first Replenish ‘Tackling Anxiety’ workshops and had my little dog of 17 years euthanized. 


The Day he Left...
Whenever I would play piano or put on any classical music my dog, Rico would always sit in a trance. He loved music. The day he died he was on the sofa as the vet injected him with what would be his end. Pavarotti played on the radio. After he (Rico, not Pavarotti) had been wrapped up in his favourite blanket and given to the vet for cremation I closed the door, entered the living room again where he had just been alive, 10 mins earlier, and suddenly from the radio came a triumphant ‘Hallelujah’. It was as if Rico, my best friend since I was 11 until I was 28, was telling me that he was happy he was no longer in pain. Despite the devastation I was experiencing,I felt content. 
The following week I continued on with the rest of the Replenish workshops. 


For the following weeks I did numerous mental health talks, workshops and felt completely and utterly in awe of the response and demand of Replenish. I felt I was serving my purpose in this life. There’s nothing like that feeling of fulfillment. Nothing at all. 








Saturday 27th May

A dream came true this day. 
For years, since I can remember, I have been listening to Guns ‘n’ Roses. They soothed me as I would slide down my bedroom wall in the midst of a panic attack, and became the soundtrack to the best summers of my life. So, I hoped, for equal amount of years of listening to them, that they would reunite despite having broken up long before I was born. 

On that Saturday, I saw them reunited and play in Slane. I paid over €300 to stand right under the guitar riffs of Slash and the swaying hair of Axl Rose. I went on my own. Like, I didn’t know of anyone else who would pay that money. I didn’t know anyone on that same level as me. So, I stood, on my own, completely immersed in the dream that was now a reality. I was paying homage to my ultimate therapist. The therapist who was there long before anyone else was. 

 I’ll never forget that day for as long as I live. Some of the best moments are spent alone, and I wouldn’t have it any other way. 



Sunday 18th June

I was in Bombachsee, Germany in the lake and ‘Supping’ (Stand Up Paddling). Germany, in its reliable nature, gives the most beautiful summers. The Sun almost melts away my mental health 'errors', like a brand new anti-virus on a backed-up computer with corrupted files. 



Tuesday 27th June


By this time Replenish was on its third cycle of workshops in Derry and just started its first cycle of ‘Tackling Anxiety & Depression’ in Letterkenny, Donegal. From here I would gain the greatest of friends who would come to be integral to the success of Replenish. It was like realising that the isolated island that you'd be on all your life was actually full of people, just like you. Glorious!

Tuesday 13th July

For two weeks I went to the Portuguese sun. Had a dose of the anti-virus again, you could say.  I spent every second restoring my levels of Vitamin D and letting the Sun doctor my mental health. Eating well, swimming in the waves that inspired the birth of Replenish and lying on the sand, a lifestyle I hope to cultivate on a more permanent basis.  A paradise of sorts. 










Thursday 27th July

I held the first session of the Replenish workshops in Sligo. I travelled to Sligo every week, some days a little anxious than others simply for no reason at all; to be expected of course when living with an somewhat unstable mind.  In the Sligo workshops I gained what I can only describe as a sisterhood. A sisterhood I’m very, very grateful for and in constant awe of. 


Monday 21st August

Replenish was in full throttle and I had given over 10 talks to schools, workplaces, events and this Monday marked the day Replenish had its first meeting with a company that it would later result in a fruition of collaboration. I could hardly recognise myself. I was exceeding my own expectations, surprising myself with strength I didn't even know I had and becoming more and more unapologetic about my authenticity. Replenish too, at this point, surpassed all my objectives, targets and expectations. 









Saturday 9th September


I was standing at a podium in Dublin speaking at the Endometriosis Association of Ireland. I didn’t consider this as another ‘talk’. It was so much more. It was a divine privilege to be invited to speak to women, dealing with a crippling condition, from a mental health standpoint.  
I was also preparing for the biggest event in the Mental Health Calendar, World Mental Health Day (October 10th).  Among having University Students, private clients, workshops running in Derry and Sligo, I went to Madrid. Naturally! 
You see, being in a long-distance relationships means committing to meeting up. For Stephen and I, we meet every three or four weeks either at home in Derry, Germany or somewhere we’ve never been. So I was making sure I was still making time for my relationship. Stephen was working in Madrid that weekend, so I met him there and sat under the Madrid sun and worked on Replenish’s first ‘World Mental Health Day’.  I enjoyed the sites of Madrid too of course when work got somewhat all-consuming. Regular breaks are needed to keep the stress levels at a minimum. Pre-existing mental health issues and stress are a poisonous mix.


When I arrived back to Ireland I began filming for our short film ‘Unfiltered Water’ that would be screened on the day of our World Mental Health Day event.










Tuesday 10th October

We had an event where many professionals came together to give talks, presentations and advice on how mental health can be managed. We had Yasmin our Occupational Therapist, Riadh our Nutritionist, Michelle our Pharmacist. We then had Counsellor Natasha, Financial expert Emma and Trainee Mental Health Nurse, Dee on a very interesting panel. We also enjoyed Yoga with Sophie, Exercise with George, Complementary Therapy with Megan and Massage with Foshie.


Tuesday 17th October 

I started the Replenish workshops in Limavady on Tuesday evening. The following day I was in Antrim giving a talk to a hall full of business owners in the construction industry on Mental Health in the Workplace. That evening I was back in Derry beginning the 5th cycle of Derry workshops. These workshops were different this time because they now involved ALL of the professionals who were involved in the Replenish 'World Mental Health Day'.

Wednesday 8th November 

By now I had just come back from my 4th trip of the year to Germany and was straight into giving another talk for the Donegal Youth Service on 'Body Image Initiative'. I used to work with youth in my previous jobs and so it's always a territory I feel natural in, and of course honoured. 

Friday 24th November

I was on my way to Dublin to meet my boyfriend who'd be flying in from Germany. This would be the last time I'd see him before he'd come home for three weeks on December 19th. During this weekend we explored Dublin in a different way, this time through the eyes of Jame Joyce. We then enjoyed a vintage cinematic experience in the beautiful Stella theatre in Rathmines. Of course, I met The Makeup Fairy, who'd become a good friend. Finding friendship in people who you'd think would never want a friendship with you soothes all the insecurities of the inner 12 year old who always thought she was incompatible with everyone because she was a little peculiar. 


December 

As you can imagine December lived up to its reputation of overindulging, dinners, sweets, open fires, presents and visits. I had a lovely December. Minimal stress.It marked the 8th month since I had become vegetarian. I had the most beautiful vegetarian Christmas dinner too, in case you were wondering. On the evening before New Year's Eve I felt that old familiar pang of fear, leeching anxiety and drowning mood. Why? Well, I don't know. Like I said, mental health illness will do that to you, simply remind you that it's there, watching. 

I allowed myself to feel like this. Not fighting it and not judging myself for feeling like that takes the emphasis and importance off it; less attention. When you consciously refuse to give something attention and focus on something else, it eventually pipes down. I got up, even though I wanted to lie in a heap, drove to my friend Natasha to have my brows done and came away yes, with beautiful brows, but also a lifted mood, invigorated feelings and concentrated gratefulness for having a my tribe; A tribe that I wouldn't know unless I had 'acted' on my mental health. 

****





January 1 2018

And now I sit, in present time. Nothing has changed much since we welcomed in 2018 with close friends.  I don't believe in a 'New Year, New Me'. I believe in a New Year a more mentally strong me, a more emotionally intelligent me, a stronger me. I wouldn't change who I am, I've worked too hard on becoming who I am. However, I do want to tell you that I will embark on 2018 with a little bit more appetite for victories. 

So, why do I consider my 2017 victorious when there will be people reading these dates and thinking "what is so 'victorious' about all of this?"

So here's why:

I did ALL of 2017 whilst living with a mental health disorder.
Those days started with me taking my usual three tablets along with a few vitamins for what the 'World Health Organisation' considers the "tenth most debilitating disorder in the world."

During the dark days, the days where I didn't want to get out of bed, or when my hormones made my O.C.D spike and more unbearable than usual, I still made my dream a reality. 

I felt fulfilled in my work, my friends and my entire existence.
I disciplined myself. Exercised, ate well, took time to myself regularly, introverted, became more unapologetic in my authenticity. I grew in all aspects of mind.  I acted on my mental health, the tagline of 'Replenish'. 

I also took a lot of self-care. A LOT! If I didn't then I wouldn't be able to work in the way I wanted to. 


If you read all those diary extracts again, but this time imagined yourself doing all that I've done with a huge stone in your shoe whilst doing it, then you'll have a new found appreciation for the lives I, and others in similar situations, live despite the mental pain we endure. 


In my work in Replenish I endeavour to become an example of how mental health doesn’t define or acts as an obstacle.The people within Replenish are my tribe because they do walk their daily lives with that same stone in their shoe. Somedays it wears us down more than other days, but we keep going because it's  exactly those kind of harsh days that condition us to become more compassionate about the people we want to work with. It drives us to go into 2018 with a great force to break the mental health stigma. We don't come from a place of business, but from a place of passion and that has made all the difference.


Act on your Mental Health in 2018 with Replenish and join 'Steps to Self-Care' Workshops

Wednesday, 20 December 2017

Christmas, When it's Not So Calm and Not So Bright

The Christmas of 2013 was not only the worst Christmas of my life, but the worst time of my life.
Months prior I had come off my mental health medication a little too quick and in November, a few days after Hallowe'en I had a major relapse. It was if my brain went into shock from withdrawing too quick. So there's the first lesson, don’t come off any psychopharmaceuticals without guidance from your Doctor.


I’m writing the following guide for you, not so much from a professional standpoint, but from a mental health sufferer warrior experience.




So here it is, a raw insight to how I got through the worst months of my life.


✷Disclaimer: There may be some triggers in the following content


Sadness & Loneliness


Christmas is a time for all families to reunite together from wherever they may be in the world. Sure, that’s lovely. However, it’s also a huge slap in the face to those of us who have lost family, whether it be through death or estrangement. That indescribable feeling in the pit of our stomachs; that heaviness on our shoulders.


It doesn’t just take death and absence of loved ones to make us feel lonely because, for some of us, our mental health has a tendency to make us feel lonely in a room full of our nearest and dearest. Sometimes, we feel sad and we don’t know why.






Feeling sad and lonely is O.K. It’s a normal human emotion. Sometimes we know why, sometimes we don’t know why. Either way, it’s important for you not to judge yourself for feeling these emotions.You’re human, It’s not wrong to feel sad, but it is unhelpful judging yourself for feeling so. Don’t try to push away or ignore your feelings. Taking time to yourself amidst the chaos of Christmas will give you time to identify why you’re feeling sad, nostalgic and lonely if you can’t actually figure out why. Oftentimes, there is an underlying reason, and taking time to reflect will often unveil the reasons. You can empower yourself to do something about it. Whether it be a lack of Vitamin D or unresolved grief.


If you’re lonely and by yourself, you don’t have to be. There is ALWAYS somebody who wants to help you, to listen and to be your friend.

If you’re dealing with feelings of despair, panic and terror remember these feelings will rise, peak and then drop again. They won’t last.


Becoming part of our Replenish Official Facebook Group is an easy, free and helpful way to taking steps to dissolve those feelings of loneliness.


Suicidal Ideation


For me, during that Christmas, I was on diazepam and sleeping tablets whilst I started taking my antidepressants again and waiting for them to take effect (This takes 4 weeks minimum).


I was very unwell. I didn’t think I could feel normal again. I didn’t think I could get past the thoughts my O.C.D was shooting me with. The thought of going on living was agonising and I didn’t want to prolong that agony. I didn’t have active plans of suicide, but I was wishing something bad would happen to me, like an accident or illness. I know this sounds terrible and very disrespectful because I know there are people fighting for their lives right now, but at that time I wished I had a terminal illness. Anything, anything instead of being inside my own head. 
As Sylvia Plath once said Is there no way out of the mind?”

I didn’t want to die, I just wanted the pain to end. It was like running up a steep hill, in excruciating pain, exhausted and sore but with no option to stop. Nowadays, when I actually am running up a steep hill, the pain is nothing near that to living with the mental torment during Christmas 2013. When I run, I smile to myself remembering my victory of learning to love life again after wanting it to end.  
Because, the thing is, you will learn to love life again. The darkness brings you to a place where you have a greater appreciation for all is that beautiful. So that’s why people who have been through the hardest times, have the greatest appreciation for the small, often overlooked and beautiful things in life. We need people like YOU to help people dealing with similar experiences. It takes somebody like you, an expert by experience, to really make a change in mental health awareness because you know what it's like and you know what it takes to help somebody.






So how did I come out of this darkness?


I didn’t have any quick-fix solution. I persevered through the agony. I didn’t believe my thoughts of “they’d be better off without me”. I knew these were negative, false thoughts. I decided to live. I chose to live. When I wanted to lie in bed, I actually made myself get up, get dressed, show up and never gave up. Getting up and getting showered may seem like nothing to the average person, but as Bryony Gordon said about her depression “it was like walking through treacle.”
Yes, due to the nature of our unique minds, not everyone will really understand the sting of your anxiety fuelled feelings, your sinister O.C.D thoughts and the depths of your depression. But do you know what? And this is for people who feel frustrated about feeling helpless when seeing a loved one suffer with their mental health:

You do not have to be a psychiatrist or a psychologist to help your anxious friend, or depressed cousin or grieving partner. All you have to do is be there. To sit with them, hug them and comfort them with kindness and support.




My Mother and Father, and the rest of the world for that matter, will never really understand my O.C.D, and they don’t have to.
During that Christmas all my Daddy had to do to help me with my mental health was light the fire everyday. I tell this to everyone in the Replenish workshops, to illustrate how something,like primal act of building and sitting beside a fire, can really have a therapeutic benefit. All my Mother had to do was sit beside me and talk to me about light-hearted things.  They didn’t have to know C.B.T, and they didn’t have to anything other than be there.
Let me say, the mindset that you may be in now isn’t going to be the mindset you’ll be in for the rest of the year. A few bad weeks, heck even months, aren’t a determinant for how the rest of your life will be, as much as it feels like it’s never going to change. It will. I’m proof of that.


During Christmas…


During Christmas it’s important to remember that when you see happy, perfect scenes on social media it isn’t how it actually is. Every photograph is choreographed and strategically formed, and NOT true to life. So remember that before you compare your situation to the false ones you see online.


Take it easy. Just because everyone has a party to be doesn’t mean you have to. Go ahead if you want, but don’t feel obliged. The best thing for me was to take very small steps. I would get up, have de-caf tea (caffeine is to be avoided when you’re mentally unwell), shower, put on a little makeup, put on loungewear and sit and do something creative like making Christmas cards. I’d then watch a movie, have a sleep and then have some dinner, sit with my parents, watch another movie and then go to bed. This may seem like a ‘lazy’ routine, but it was what I felt only able to do. Everyday I got stronger, i’d leave the house for an hour, then come home feeling accomplished. I’d go a walk the next day and then visit family. I slowly built myself up again at my own pace.
Do not feel an obligation to be happy. Focus on YOU.





Recovery and self-care isn’t about one solution as much as it’s about small actions. For me, building myself up a little bit more as each day progressed resulted in me then, exactly a year later, strong enough to travel to Australia on my own to visit my brother. Again, this may seem a trivial pursuit to the average person, however remember how unwell I was a year before. A small victory for many, a huge victory for me. Therapy, medication, exercise, creativity, diet and planning are all aspects of my wellbeing that sustains me and something that you can avail of this coming January when Replenish begins its 'Steps to Self-Care' workshops.


This Christmas you deserve to be relaxed. You deserve to de-stress. You need to take time to yourself, to take self-care and to build yourself back up to your strong self, because that version of you already exists, you just have to take the journey to meet yourself. It won’t be easy, it won’t be smooth but it’ll be worth it.


If you find you’re in distress this Christmas, please see the emergency numbers below:


Lifeline
  • Telephone: 0808 808 8000

The Samaritans

The Samaritans offer a 24-hour telephone helpline:
  • Telephone: 028 9066 4422 (local call charges apply)
  • National telephone:116 123 (this number is free to call)
  • textphone: 08457 90 91 92
Email me: Replenishyourmind@gmail.com

Friday, 1 December 2017

The Rise of C.B.D oil



You will have heard all of the members of the Replenish team mention the benefits of C.B.D oil at some stage of our workshops, videos, talks, etc.

In the previous  Replenish's 'Steps to Self-Care' post, under the 'Medication: Synthetic and Herbal' section I talked about if I thought "a  client could benefit from a natural aid to promote calm I'd always recommend ‘C.B.D. oil’. I wish I had this oil when I was a teenager rather than the placebo of ‘Kalms’ and ‘Quiet Life’."



So I'm excited to let you know that MacCaffery's Chemist in Derry (and online) are stocked up on C.B.D oil and ready to sell to you with the added perk of working with 'Replenish' and giving you a discount code at check-out online and in-store.





But first, let me sound like a cheesy commercial and tell you why C.B.D oil could change your life like it has changed mine.


So, I live with O.C.D. I'm on medication for it. I have my self-care plan that consists of a mental-health friendly diet, yoga, hobbies, routines. You get the gist. However, despite all of this, I still get bad days, especially if I'm hormonal or stressed. So whilst I allow myself to have the bad days I also take C.B.D oil.

Why do I take C.B.D oil?

As I've said, I still get my bad days.  So why I recommend C.B.D oil is because all humans have what is called our ‘Endogenous Cannabinoid System’  that regulates our mood, sleep, appetite, hormone regulation, pain, and immunity response.
However our lifestyles can cause stresses that interfere with our mood, sleep and all those other important elements of health. So taking CBD oil regulates any imbalances in our already existing cannabinoid system.

So that's why C.B.D oil, in high strengths, is also used by people with conditions that cause chronic pain, whether it be people with Fibromyalgia, Cancer and bone diseases.It has anti-inflammatory benefits and can also be used to treat acne. It’s important to consult with your Doctor or pharmacist about taking C.B.D oil for any of the aforementioned conditions.

Is it legal?

Absolutely. I’d not recommend it otherwise (lol) It’s not legal in all countries, but it is in Ireland. It can be bought in health food shops and in pharmacies such as MacCafferty’s.
It is legal because whilst it’s from the 'Cannabis Stavia L' plant, it does not contain as much THC as marijuana, which is the psychoactive chemical that gives a ‘high’ effect. It's the fact that it's hemp, low in THC and high in CBD, which makes it legal.


How to use it?

The oil can also come in ‘powder’ form that people mix into creams to rub on their bodies. However, it’s commonly bought as an oil. It’s recommended to take a few drops, to begin with, under the tongue for maximum and quicker absorption into the bloodstream.
The C.B.D oil comes in various strengths and prices.

Want to buy it now?

MacCafferty’s Pharmacy stock and sell three different strengths of a reputable brand of C.B.D. They are also offering 10% discount to anyone who quotes ‘Replenish’ at the till or in the coupon box in the online check-out.

Buy it HERE





Have you tried it yet? Let me know in the Replenish Official Facebook Group.
 

Tuesday, 14 November 2017

The Steps to Self-Care


Steps to Self-Care

Self-care is something that should be taken so seriously.  It’s as important as our need, and right for food and water to sustain us.

Self-care is not about ‘looking good’ as social media may suggest. You have to actually enrich the energy that resides within you.
Our society glorifies ‘busy’, and it’s a trend that we’re all trying to keep up with, much to the detriment of our mental health and overall wellbeing. We’re simply not taking the time out that we need, irrespective of whether or not we think we deserve it. 





The fact that ‘Replenish: Acting on Mental Health’ is just under a year old and yet booked by numerous companies and businesses to deliver ‘Mental Health in the Workplace’ workshops is suffice to indicate that the need for, and recognition of, self-care is becoming more prevalent.  After all, how can a business be prolific in its output of services and goods if its workforce isn’t in optimum health?





On a Personal Level

For myself personally, self-care is a sacred factor in maintaining my wellbeing. Living with a mental health disorder alongside being a therapist means that it’s not a choice, but a necessity. 
After all, “You can’t pour from an empty cup”. 
So whilst I am on medication for my mental health, AND as knowledgable in the field of mental health care and support as I try to be, I still am very conscious of the fact that my mental health can still be quite precarious and inclined to deteriorate if certain steps are not taken and efforts maintained.
So a few of the Replenish team have compiled a list of the steps that we all should take to ensure optimum wellbeing because mental health wellbeing isn’t dependant on ‘one solution’, unfortunately. It’s the realisation that wellbeing and recovery is comprised of smaller pieces that accumulate to make up a customised and personalised jigsaw of wellness.   




As I go through these steps you’ll see why ‘Replenish’ is made up of various professionals of various fields that are conducive to acting on mental health.

Each steps is written by a professional within Replenish and you will be able to contact as they've listed their contact details below. 

To begin with, Yasmin will detail the importance of her role as an Occupational Therapist in developing a lifestyle conducive to good mental health.





Occupational Therapy

Yasmin Leake ||Occupational Therapist ||
Helping you Balance

As an Occupational Therapist, one of our main focuses is understanding the importance of and creating a balance between a human’s occupations. 
Occupational balance is a way of being, cultivated by a multitude of self care, productivity and leisure occupations.  Balanced engagement in such occupations should promote feelings of positivity, satisfaction and achievement. 
I am therefore a firm believer in working with my clients to review their current daily routines and find strategies that will achieve a balance in their daily routine. 
By investing time in balancing your self care, productivity and leisure occupations, you are likely to benefit from an increased sense of well being and able to manage stress more effectively. 
There is no quick fix to managing your mental health, instead focus on making your whole health a priority every day and you will see positive changes. 
One of my favourite habits I practice every day is going for a 30 minute walk. I try to do this in the morning time when I first wake up, it’s my ‘me’ time, it allows me to be in nature and calm my mind before my working day commences.  It could also be an idea to incorporate an after dinner walk in the evening as an opportunity to unwind and distress from the day. 
If you would like any additional tips/help in creating an occupational balance please contact me at:
yasmin.leake@gmail.com   


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Step 1
Medication

Michelle Harkin || Pharmacist||


Taking medication for mental health is only one of many tools. It can help reduce symptoms enough to enable a person to pursue and receive benefits from lifestyle changes, support groups and counselling. As a pharmacist,  I am aware that most people don't particularly want to feel that they need medication for any illness, but if appropriate, taking care of yourself in the best possible way is always a good thing and is not a sign of weakness.
---- 





What Caroline has to say...


Medication isn’t for everyone. It’s not needed by every person who has anxiety and or depression because depending on the severity of your condition, you can manage it without pharmaceuticals. However, I have a clinical diagnosis of O.C.D, the “tenth most debilitating disorder in the world” according to the World Health Organisation. So basically, I need my medication to help me function and to live a ‘normal’ life. 

When I think a client could benefit from an natural aid to promote calm I always recommend ‘C.B.D. oil’. I wish I had this oil when I was a teenager rather than the placebo of ‘Kalms’ and ‘Quiet Life’. 

So what is CBD OIL?
CBD hemp oil is from the Cannabis plant, however it is legal because it doesn’t have THC, which is the psychoactive ingredient that gives that ‘high’. 

What does it do?
All humans have what is called our ‘Endogenous Cannabinoid System’  that regulates our mood, sleep, appetite, hormone regulation, pain, and immunity response.
However our lifestyles can cause stresses that interfere with our mood, sleep and all those other important elements of health. So taking CBD oil regulates any imbalances in our already existing cannabinoid system. 

Buy CBD oil HERE

 What else can it be used for:
Whilst I myself use if for hormonal times, it’s often used by many to help with:

- Anxiety
  - Epilepsy    
      - Cancer pain
       - Chronic pain






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  Step 2
Diet & Supplements

RĂ­adh Egan || Nutritionist||

Nutrition and supplementation for your mental health

Like an expensive car, your brain functions best when it gets premium fuel. This is why adequate nutrition is so important for our mental health. Eating high quality food that contains lots of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants nourishes the brain and protects it from oxidative stress - the “waste” produced when the body uses oxygen, which can damage cells. 

Your brain can be damaged if you ingest anything other than premium fuel. If substances from “low premium” fuel (such as those you get from processed foods) get to the brain it has little ability to get rid of them. Diets high in sugar are harmful our brain and promote inflammation and oxidative stress. 


Vitamin Supplementation 

Vitamin B complex 

The B complex vitamins include 11 vitamins essential to mental health and well being. They cannot be stored in our bodies therefore we must depend on our diet to supply them. They can be destroyed by alcohol, refined sugars, caffefine and niacatine. 

Oral contraceptives in women can deplete the body of vitamins B6. this particular nutrient is needed for normal mental health functioning. In such cases vitamin B6 can improve mood. Deficiency in vitamin B12 can cause depression and in B6 can disrupt the formation of neurotransmitters in the brain.

According to a study reported in neuropsychobiology, supplementation of nine of these vitamins improves mood in both men and women. This mood improvement was particularly associated with vitamin B2 and B6.


Folate 
When we hear folate or folic acid we usually think of women in pregnancy or trying to conceive. But actually it is something I recommend for individuals with a mental health illness. 

It has been observed that people with depression have blood folate levels, which are, on an average, 25% lower than healthy controls.
Low levels of folate have also been identified as a strong predisposing factor of poor outcome with antidepressant therapy.

 Folic acid can enhance the effectiveness of antidepressant medication according to studies. 




Vitamin D 

Also known as the Sunshine Vitamin as we get it from the sun. Living in Ireland or any other country that really only sees the sun a couple of months in the year, means that the majority of the population can be deficient in Vitamin D. 

Buy 'The D' Here HERE 


Vitamin D receptors have been found in many parts of the brain.
Some of the receptors in the brain are receptors for vitamin D, which means that vitamin D is acting in some way in the brain. These receptors are found in the areas of the brain that are linked to the development of depression. For this reason, vitamin D has been linked with depression and with other mental health problems.


Exactly how vitamin D works in the brain isn’t fully understood. One theory is that vitamin D affects the amount of chemicals called monoamines, such as serotonin, and how they work in the brain.5 Many anti-depressant medications work by increasing the amount of monoamines in the brain. Therefore vitamin D may also increase the amount of monoamines, which may help treat depression.



Feel Good Foods for your Mental Health 
 Spinach 
Avocado 
Strawberries 
Pineapples 
Green Tea 
Almonds
Tomatos 
Dark Chocolate 
Asparagus 


Should you need any information on nutrition or supplementation please free feel to get in touch. 
Phone: 0863529366

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Step 3
Yoga

Sophie Dechant || Yoga Instructor ||

Are you really Breathing? 
I know you’re breathing .. about 25,000 times a day. 
But are you really aware of all these breaths you take? 

Stop Right Now

  • Place both hands gently on your belly EXHALE all of the air out of  your lungs through your nose.

  • Now inhale (through your nose) slow and strong right down deep to your belly, pushing your hands softly outwards.

  • Exhale again. 

  • Inhale thoroughly. Keep moving your hands with your breath. Up and down. Up and down.
-
                                           
 Now you’re breathing. 
This is abdominal breathing, the first way yoga students are taught to breathe.
Breathe properly and you send oxygen flooding into every cell of your body...yes, your cells breathe. Breathing is important because our cells need a constant supply of oxygen so they can produce energy. Without oxygen cellular function is impaired and and cell death is possible.
So we can see that breath is the very essence of life. In yoga we call it Prana, which is known as 'life force'.
Breathing calms the autonomic nervous system and induces a sense of calm and relaxation. 
It helps us deal with unnecessary impulsive reactions and reduces our stress levels.
Starting with simple abdominal breathing will benefit you physically and mentally


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Step 4

Self-Respect and Self-Awareness
Natasha Clyde Mulhern || Counsellor ||

When I feel low & anxious I feel worthless, like I have nothing interesting to say to my friends, family, colleagues. Especially colleagues & customers - the people who least know me. The paranoia is relentless & persistent & exhausting. The internal dialogue - 'they think I'm boring/stupid, they wish I'd hurry up, they think I'm weird because I don't go on work nights out or drink, I'm the only one who makes mistakes' and on and on the list is endless.

When I'm having a 'bad day' I see no point in anything, there's no colour, everything is messy & dis-organised. I just want to stay in bed. I feel like I am merely going through the motions, functioning at the lowest level necessary, existing - NOT living.
That is what anxiety does to you. It robs you of your personality, robs you of your confidence and robs you of your identity. 


My only thought can be HOPE. Recovering from the way I feel on those 'bad days'. I can tell those of you who feel like this that your emotions do come back in recovery. Your confidence and personality gradually return in little strips, building up in layers, until eventually you feel like the person you were before you became ill.

It takes commitment & tenacity. It takes speaking up, confiding in your 'tribe', being honest with yourself & with them. Totally honest. If you can't say it out loud, technology is your friend - put it in a text, just start the conversation.

Everyone's self-care is different. For me it's taking quiet time out, detaching, re-charging. My work is busy, both physically & mentally demanding, so quiet time is vital for me. I like to spend time with people who are close in my circle, people I feel safe with. Movies, pamper time, naps, meditation - these are all things I enjoy & make time to incorporate them into my life. It's absolutely vital for me. 

I read a lot about anxiety & obsessive thoughts. Meeting Caroline has been an absolutely pivotal part in my recovery. Finally I felt like I could speak about how I was feeling, without fear. It was absolutely liberating. I drove home exhilarated after my first group session - I WAS NOT ALONE.

One thing I've read & utilise now on the daily is this :
"Never say yes when you mean no, and never say no when you means yes"
'




Simple but effective. Try it. I was a people pleaser even to my detriment on most occasions & now I realise I also need to please myself. 
I've started challenging negative thoughts when I have them and try to list facts to support the thoughts - the majority of the time they are unsupported.
I am the most impatient person, this I know. With everything in my life, not just wanting to be well. Recovery, I am told, will come in time. There is no time limit or magic cure. Everybody is different and some people will recover more quickly than others. Medication & therapy which works for one person might be totally ineffective for you - as I've discovered. Yes, it's frustrating - please trust me, just be patient and your body will take care of itself in its own time.
Remember this - you deserve to BE WELL. If you are struggling to be taken seriously by health professionals then be aware that you can take an advocate with you to help speak with you. I took Caroline with me to get the ball rolling. It started my journey towards reclaiming good mental health & has given me confidence to speak up to my GP since.

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Please feel free to join our Replenish group for more vital information on how you can Act on your Mental Health:

Work with us: Replenish
 



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